Parents are active partners at Vanier. You know your child's needs and strengths. We bring the team and programs.

Together, we make it better.

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Vanier is a leader in children's mental health. Our quality services target problems early, so that kids have a better chance to become healthy adults.

We help families change and grow.

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Parenting is one of the toughest jobs going. Add mental health problems and it's even tougher. Vanier helps more than 1,000 children every year overcome depression, anxiety, ADHD and more.

Confidential. No judgment. We're here for you.

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In Crisis
519-433-0334

The Crisis Intake Team (CIT) is ready for your call.

Our Stories
Former Vanier client Bryan Boyd never thought about what life would be like a decade in the future. In fact, he never even thought about what the next day would bring. That all changed when he found himself alone and living on the streets of London. Bryan sounds like he's been through a battle. He has the voice of a shell-shocked young man, and he's still fighting his way through. The remarkable thing about Bryan is his capacity for self-reflection and a determination to change. Bryan says, "When I was younger, I didn't care about anything or anybody, including myself." He describes his own behaviour as violent, and his life as chaotic and filled with bad choices and the wrong people. There is a history of depression in Bryan's family, and his home life was deeply troubled. He didn't get along with his parents or siblings, and at eleven he was separated from them and moved to several foster homes in London. The chaos and violence continued for years. He lived in residence at Vanier for a year while attending grades seven and eight at White Oaks Public School. That year, like many years before, was characterized by suspensions and poor grades. "In school, I got A's when I worked at it, but it was a choice not to. I didn't think about the consequences of anything I did. That was the year I hit rock bottom," remembers Bryan. Eventually, he ended up in the custody of Children's Aid Society (CAS). Although it didn't seem like it at the time, that year was pivotal for Bryan because he was diagnosed with Bi-Polar Disorder. Earlier on he had been diagnosed with ADHD, but the medications he was given were ineffectual. A proper diagnosis means he has an opportunity to more fully understand his own feelings and behaviours. He also has the possibility of moderating them with appropriate medication. At seventeen he found himself out on his own. By nineteen things had deteriorated, and he was living on the streets with nothing to look forward to. In a classic turn, he woke up one day and realized he didn't want to live the life he was living anymore. He recognized if he didn't take control of it himself, nothing was going to change. So he went deep within and started to imagine a new life.  
Bonnie's Blog
This article, from the website "Edutopia", explains why teaching children to be kind to each other is important and how it helps prevent bullying, depression a
Spotlight On
Dr. Jeff Carter's new role at Vanier _____________________________________ Vanier is announced as Lead Agency in Middlesex County _____________________________________ Celebrating 50 Years of Childre